2013-14

Theme 1 : Models of ecological response

1.1 – Development of high-resolution land cover datasets and rainfall-runoff models to inform other projects
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Purpose and output
This project will produce high-resolution land cover datasets and link them to spatially explicit hydrologic models. In doing this, it will support the prediction of ecological and hydrologic responses to management actions and the development of prioritization frameworks.
Contact:
Chris Walsh

Timing:

2013-14 (and ongoing)

1.2 – Understanding drivers of river health in the MW region to inform management
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Purpose and output
This project ultimately aims allow a more direct link between model predictions and management activities. Initially, the project will develop predictive models for stream temperature across the region; produce communication products from the macroinvertebrate, fish and temperature modelling work already conducted and develop new spatial weighting methods.
Contact:
Chris Walsh

Timing:
2013-14 (and ongoing)

1.3 – Spatial prioritization of waterway management for biodiversity outcomes
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Purpose and output
This project will develop and implement spatial planning tools that will allow different planning options and their associated outcomes to be evaluated. These tools will inform prioritization of restoration works and protection and scales of investment for next water plan.
Contact:
Chris Walsh

Timing:
2013-16

1.4 – Refining hydrologic prediction in ungauged subcatchments
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Purpose and output
This trial project will determine if the flow regime of of ungauged streams in the region can be predicted using modelling. If successful, the project could be expanded with the aim of predicting the flow regime of every sub-catchment in the region.
Contact:
Matthew Burns

Timing:
2014

1.5 – Assessing the status of baseflows in urban streams
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Project Description (PDF)

Purpose and output
This project will develop an objective and soundly based framework to increase understanding of baseflows in Melbourne streams. This framework will support decision making with regard to requests to divert baseflows from MW-managed assets.
Contact:
Matthew Burns

Timing:
2013

Theme 2 : Flow and water quality management

2.1 – Optimizing flow regimes in the context of a superabundance of water
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Purpose and output
This project will determine whether ecologically important components of the flow regime can be maintained at levels likely to sustain healthy ecosystems, even when total runoff volume remains significantly higher than natural. The project will provide important guidance to Melbourne Water in existing and new urban areas.
Contact:
Tim Fletcher

Timing:
2013-14

2.2 – Modelling the benefits of stormwater control measures on reducing flooding
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Project Description (PDF)

Purpose and output
This project aims to test the potential of dispersed source-control stormwater management measures (e.g. rainwater tanks, rain-gardens, etc.) for flood mitigation. It will develop a methodology by which the flood impacts of source-control measures can be assessed, with potential application to existing and new urban areas.
Contact:
Matthew Burns

Timing:
2013-15

2.3 – Modelling of global urban stormwater runoff excess
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Project Description (PDF)

Purpose and output
This project aims to use a global hydrologic model to estimate the extent of the problem to the world’s rivers and the opportunity to the world’s urban dwellers that is posed by urban stormwater globally.
Contact:
Chris Walsh

Timing:
2013-14

Theme 3 : Catchment scale interventions

3.1 – Scaling up the hydrological consequences of site-scale stormwater control measures
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Project Description (PDF)

Purpose and output
This project will employ a spatially distributed hydrologic model and apply it to an urban study catchment, for the purpose of examining the hydrological consequences of small scale SCMs at different scales—sub-catchment, reach, and catchment. It will provide guidance on the optimal scales and arrangements of SCMs to achieve waterway health objectives
Contact:
Matthew Burns

Timing:
2013-16

3.2 – Monitoring of stream response to catchment-scale interventions
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Project Description (PDF)

Purpose and output
This project aims to demonstrate the ecological and cost-effectiveness of dispersed catchment-scale stormwater management for stream protection. It will contribute critical scientific knowledge to the field of restoration ecology and inform the development of new urban water policies and management approaches.
Contact:
Samantha Imberger

Timing:
2013-16

3.3 – Long-term performance and willingness to maintain distributed stormwater control measures
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Project Description (PDF)

Purpose and output
This project will examine the factors that influence the amount and quality of maintenance Stormwater Control Measures receive. It will explore both socio-institutional factors and practical constraints, in order that the life cycle costs and performance of SCMs can be clarified and management strategies developed to ensure long-term performance.
Contact:
Darren Bos

Timing:
2014-16

Theme 4 : Assessment of stream management activities

4.1 – Understanding the values of zero-order streams and their importance in protecting downstream waterways.
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Project Description (PDF)

Purpose and output
This aim of this project is to support formation of policies for protection and/or management of Zero-order streams (drainage lines), by providing practical guidelines for their management. It will do this by assessing the effectiveness of treatment systems located within an ephemeral waterway/drainage line on rural land, and the potential for improving the nitrogen retention in urban riparian zones, through a biomimicry approach.
Contact:
Tim Fletcher

Timing:
2013-16

4.2 – Investigations into the water regime requirements of Eucalyptus camphora at Yellingbo Nature Conservation Reserve
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Project Description (PDF)

Purpose and output
This project involves research into the water regime requirements of Eucalyptus camphora at Yellingbo Nature Conservation Reserve (home to the endangered Helmeted Honeyeater and Leadbeater’s Possum), which is currently under threat from dieback and a lack of natural regeneration. This research will inform the design and implementation of a monitoring and evaluation program to assess the response of vegetation condition to capital works by MW aimed at naturalising water regimes within YNCR
Contact:
Joe Greet

Timing:
2013-14

4.3 – Supporting the MERI framework through improved NRM planning.
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Project Description (PDF)

Purpose and output
The aim of this project is to develop revisit the ecological underpinnings of restoration within an intervention planning framework that better draws on conceptual and quantitative physical and ecological models to inform the scale and time-lags implicit in successful restoration.
Contact:
Nick Bond

Timing:
2013-18

Theme 5 : Community engagement

5.1 – Effectiveness of alternative community engagement strategies
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Project Description (PDF)

Purpose and output
This project will explore how Melbourne Water’s Waterways team can best engage the community. Should their engagement methods differ across the region (and how) and to what extent can Melbourne Water design engagement methods that they will be effective across the region? The aim is to develop a toolbox of effective engagement methods.
Contact:
Peter Morrison

Timing:
2014-17

5.2 – Making incentives matter: understanding the effectiveness of incentives in stimulating community waterways practices
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Project Description (PDF)

Purpose and output
The project aims to assist Melbourne Water by investigating the community’s willingness to pay for and participate in catchment-scale schemes that provide multiple benefits. The project will create an Institutional Analysis and Development framework summarising the patterns of interactions that yield better understandings of participation in different integrated water management projects.
Contact:
Peter Morrison
Timing:
2015-18
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